PLAGIARISM AND FAKE RADIO RECEPTION REPORTS?

PLAGIARISM AND FAKE RADIO RECEPTION REPORTS?
Yessiree. There are a few DXers out there who in the pursuit of a QSL have the gall to fabricate a reception report. The phenomenon, if it can be called that, is nothing new. It is as old as radio itself.
Why address the subject? Well, a few days back a fellow DXer and free-radio operator called it to my attention. He informed me of an individual who, apparently after reading my blog entry for his station, decided to pass off a reception report as his own. The station alerted me and promptly asked the guy to submit an audio file of the transmission. Guess what? He couldn’t produce it.
Wait a minute! He could have sourced the Internet for an audio file and produced a sample, right? It does happen. I actually had one young man do just that. He submitted a file of WWV and CHU on frequencies for times normally not received in his quarter, yet he tried to pass it off as genuine. How did I know it was fake, aside from the obvious physics? The audio file — stolen from a fellow radio listener — still had the original Box or Soundcloud name attached to it.
Even with the advent of remote web-receivers some DXers attempt to pass off the remote RX location as their home RX location. A diligent station engineer/operator will immediately recognise this for what it is — a bogus or less than accurate report. Why hide the obvious fact? There is no shame in stating the actual RX location, even if it is remotely observed. Simply keep one’s home and remote QSLs in separate categories. Be honest.
Now, it is possible to submit a reception report to a station, honestly believing it is a particular broadcaster. The time, frequency and language of the broadcaster all seem to be the station. Unfortunately after either submitting a report or further listening, usually days later, one discovers the error. It happens. I have done it more than a few times myself over the decades. Yet, I will fess up and duly note my error.
Folks, honesty is more priceless than any QSL, however prized it may be. No DX contest for X number of stations, X number of countries is worth sacrificing one’s integrity. Be patient and diligent in DXing. It’s like fishing. It takes time, calculation and patience. And the results are far more rewarding when one knows it was a genuine catch.
Happy DXing!!!

WRTH 2015

WRTH 2015 will be published, as usual, in early December. This will be the 69th Annual edition! Even though both International and Domestic SW is declining there is still a lot to be heard out there on those broadcast bands, so don’t consign the SW receiver to the attic (to gather dust) just yet.
There is a mix of over 200 languages and dialects to get stuck in to, plus the Clandestine broadcasters are always around from politically troubled areas.
Some of these are low powered or broadcasting to a different part of the world and can be a tough challenge to pick up.
All the details you need to stand the best chance of catching these, or any of the other broadcasters (be it LW, MW, SW or FM), can be found in WRTH.
You will soon be able to reserve your copy of the 2015 edition and be one of the first to receive it. Check the WRTH website for pre-ordering details. If the 2014 edition is still showing, try again in a few days time.

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